Interior Design Fabrics

Interior finish materials, like fabrics, are the last in long list of design choices that affect the finished product. Our Interior Design Fabrics page offers a more in depth look at some fabric options:

Acrylic
A manufactured fiber derived from polyacrylonitrile. Its major properties include a soft, wool-like hand, machine washable and dryable, excellent color retention. Solution-dyed versions have excellent resistance to sunlight and chlorine degradation.

Bamboo
A natural textile made from the pulp of bamboo grass, it is considered sustainable, because the bamboo plant grows quickly and does not require the use of herbicides and pesticides to thrive. However, bamboo fiber is produced through the cellulosic process. Bamboo fabric retains many of the same qualities it has as a plant, including excellent wicking ability that pulls moisture away from the skin. It also retains antibacterial qualities, reducing bacteria that often thrives on clothing, which causes unpleasant odors.

Cotton
Natural fiber that grows in the seed pod of the cotton plant. Fibers are typically 1/2 inch to 2 inches long. The longest staple fibers, longer than 1 1/2 inch, including the Pima and Egyptian varieties, produce the highest quality cotton fabrics.

Linen or Flax
With its crip, matte-linen finish, flax is often used for bedding and upholstery. Cultivated similarly to hemp, it requires no herbicides or artificial irrigation, and all parts of the plant are used in the production of flax fabrics. Flax fabric has natural UV-ray protection, exhibits hypoallergenic and antistatic characteristics, and is easily washed.

Merino Wool
A type of wool that originates from pure-bred Merino sheep. The best Merino wool comes from Italy. The highest, finest and best wool obtained anywhere in the world. This fiber is used only in the best of woolen and worsted fabrics, billiard cloth, etc.

Nylon
Produced in 1938, the first completely synthetic fiber developed. Known for its high strength and excellent resilience, nylon has superior abrasion resistance and high flexibility. A manufactured fiber in which the fiber-forming substance is a long chain synthetic polyamide.

Polyester
A manufactured fiber introduced in the early 1950s, and is the most commonly used manufactured fiber worldwide. Polyester’s low absorbency allows the fiber to dry quickly. Polyester fabrics are used in apparel and home furnishings (i.e. bedspreads, bedsheets, draperies and curtains). Industrial polyesters are used in ropes, tire reinforcements, safety belts, and plastics. Polyester fiberfill is used as stuffing in cushions, comforters, and pillows.

Wool
Usually associated with fiber or fabric made from the fleece of sheep or lamb. However, the term “wool” can also apply to all animal hair fibers, including the hair of the Cashmere or Angora goat or the specialty hair fibers of the camel, alpaca, llama, or vicuna. Commonly used in slacks and outerwear.